Baby, Oh Baby at The Whitefire Theatre,
BroadwayWorld LA Award Nomination –
Best Featured Actor

“Sorenson is sheer delight as Weena, the queen who just opens his mouth and gets a laugh.” – Broadway World LA

Baby, Oh Baby with Amy Tolsky

“Weena, the sister’s landlord and frequent drop in guest is a flamboyant gay man brilliantly and fondly played by the lovely Douglas Scott Sorenson.” – NoHo Arts Review

Douglas is a pure delight to watch. Giving his gay character the stereotypical ‘colorful’ whimsy you’d expect – but his take is very sharp and smart.” – The Geek Authority

“A laugh out loud rom-com farce, “Bay Oh Baby” combines excellent acting, story, and topical situations as it examines love in all it’s permutations.  Sorenson adds sarcastic flair as the hot-to-trot, flashy landlord Weena” —Tolucan Times


The Cell Theatre’s THE HYPOCHONDRIAC
Innovative Theatre Award Nominee –
Outstanding Performance by a Featured Actor

“Pulling double duty is Douglas Scott Sorenson, who is a delightfully silly Bonnefoi in the first act and Argan’s laid-back but very compassionate brother, Barry, in Act Three.” –  NY Theatre (PICK OF THE WEEK)

“…as Argan’s hyper-rational brother Barry, Sorenson shines like a beacon…”-  PopMatters.com

“As Beline’s unscrupulous accountant, Sorenson plays against his nebbish type, all but jumping Beline as the two try to change Argan’s will–only to come on later as the very solid and serious Barry”. –  Kul.com


POETIC LICENSE with Nancy Ringham at NJ Repertory Company

“Douglas Scott Sorenson is particularly convincing as Edmund. It is the most difficult role because of the conflicting strains in his behavior. Sorenson strike notes of youthful impetuousness which feel real and electric.” – Bob Rendell, Talkin’ Broadway

“Sorenson is gallant in the role of the scholar who spills out the final shocking denouement.” –  Robert L. Daniels, Variety

“…inherent tensions are experetly conveyed by (Bergman’s) four gifted and well-cast actors…with the multitalented Douglas Scott Sorenson as the boyfriend.”-  Stephen Wells, The New York Times

with Nancy Ringham

“Sorenson is like an improvising musician calling a sudden chord change with the careful detonation of a strategically placed F-bomb. We see a shadow come across his face, and feel the smile retreat from ours, as he abruptly drops the good-guy persona of the opening sequence. We enter a strange and alien territory with the actor as our not-so-comforting guide.” – Tom Cheesek, Asbury Park Press

“Douglas Scott Sorenson as Edmund, the boyfriend, who in maintaining a combination of intensity and duplicity throughout, carries the story forward outstandingly” – Milt Bernstein, The Link News

“Ms. O’donoghue and Mr. Sorenson work well together. They create a believable Gen Y couple, nervous over facing Katherine’s parents.”- Philip Dorian, The Two River Times



SIN – The Abingdon Theatre

“The actors are terrific.” “Douglas Scott Sorenson as Avery’s brother who is dying of AIDS, strikes just the right balance of vulnerability laced with pride.” – Judith Jarosz, nytheatre.com

“Douglas Scott Sorenson is particularly successful.” … “Sorenson’s performance as Avery’s AIDS patient brother is vividly authentic and thankfully manages to stay above the stereotype.” – Summer Banks, CurtainUp

“Douglas Scott Sorenson’s gallows humor, and the way he delivers it, are the highlight of the first act.” – Retta Blaney, Life Upon the Sacred Stage (Drama Desk Critic)



PROVIDENCE – The Rock Theatre

“…a particularly good performance by Douglas Sorenson.” “Douglas should be applauded as he applied his wide range switching from the past to the present and then back again in the time frame of a couple of sentences.” – Jeffrey Rog, Talkin’ Broadway

“…exceptional performances from all four actors in this true ensemble piece…” “…Sorenson is terrific as the neurotic and nuanced Mark—and watching (Crep & Sorenson) onstage is a clinic in teamwork.” – Josh Sherman, NYTheatre.com

“Sorenson shows great range with his character and has terrific chemistry with Eckblad.” “All four actors are to be commended for their splendid work…The only thing that isn’t crisp, that is messy and oh so real, is the raw emotion and power provided by Sorenson, Crep, Ekblad, and Wirth.” “This taut, emotional play about love, guilt, and resilience is not to be missed.” – Byrne Harrison, Stage Buzz



THE WHIPPING MAN – Luna Stage

“…solid performances from three very talented actors.”…”Douglas Scott Sorenson creates a conflicted wary, white Southerner trying to navigate the past and the present, and desperate to keep alive the hope of a future.” – Thom Molyneaux, The Montclair Times

w/ Frankie R. Faison

 “Douglas Scott Sorenson is appropriately gruff, overbearing and dense as Caleb…metaphorically representing the southern white American male who would take a very long time to comprehend the corrosive effect of the appalling legacy of slavery.” – Bob Rendell, Talkin’ Broadway

“Douglas Scott Sorenson’s Caleb, a rather snotty, arrogant young man, convincingly responds to the revelations that undermine everything he’s believed about his family, his society, in short, the very milieu he inhabits.” – Ruth Ross, The Essex Journal

“Sorenson’s display of physical pain and mental anguish is flawless.” – Pat Ferro, Suburban News

“…powerfully acted by the three-person Luna cast under Linnet Taylor’s incisive direction.” – Naomi Siegel, The New York Times